History

2014 Report

FIELD SCHOOLStudents’ Reflections

 

I feel that there is a common, important thread that forms the backbone of culture here which is the relationship people have with the environment. The close connection with Mother Earth is visible through profound knowledge of traditional farming techniques, abilities to read weather patterns, and the use of various herbs for an array of ailments. Continue reading

2013 Report

FIELD SCHOOL – Students’ Reflections

 

We initiated the year with our fourth New Year’s course as an intersession seminar, where we worked closely with the voluntary women’s associations of the Communities of Shilla and Shumay within the Province of Carhuaz to address issues of transparency in local government and identify capacity building needs for each organization, in conjunction with our ally civic association, Forum Solidaridad Peru (www.psf.org). We continued community support throughout the year on themes of agrobiodiversity in the face of Climate and Culture Change and the return to organic native grain propagation, focused on quinua, kiwicha and cañihua, particularly in the Quebrada Ulta, within the District of Shilla. Our May through August courses emphasized both Field Methods and Quechua Language practice and skills development in context. Professionals, as well as undergraduate and graduate students, participated from the US, Puerto Rico and Canada, with a wide range of majors that included Global Health, Medicine, Biology, International Communications, Social Work, Spanish Language, Latin American History, as well as Anthropology and Archaeology. Continue reading

2012 Report

FIELD SCHOOL – Students’ Reflections

 

We inaugurated the year with our third New Year’s course as an intersession seminar where we worked with communities within the Province of Carhuaz of Shumay, Pariacaca and Shilla to address diverse issues such as corruption in government nutrition programs, first birth experiences, and the erosion and proposed recovery of native tree species at high altitudes and agrobiodiversity. Our June and July courses emphasized Field Methods, as well as Spanish and Quechua Language practice and skills development in context. Undergraduate and graduate students participated from Canada, Portugal, Colombia, Puerto Rico and the US, with a wide range of majors that included Environmental Studies, Sociology, Global Health, Biology, International Development, English, History, Music, and Anthropology. Continue reading

2011 Report

Field School – Students’ Reflections

 

We inaugurated the year with our second New Year’s course as an intersession seminar, where we worked closely with the organized women’s association of the Community of Shilla to address issues of medicinal herb knowledge and the return to organic native maize agricultural. Our May through August courses emphasized both Field Methods and Quechua Language practice and skills development in context. Undergraduate and graduate students participated from Peru, Canada, Germany and the US, with a wide range of majors that included Latin American Studies, Global Health, Medicine, Biology, International Development Studies, Music, Theatre, Social Justice, Spanish Language and Anthropology. Continue reading

2010 Report

Field School – Students’ Reflections

 

We inaugurated the year with our first ever New Year’s session with an intersession seminar, that provided rich focus on herbal ecology and agricultural activities. Our May through August courses emphasized both Field Methods and Quechua Language practice and skills development in context. Undergraduate and graduate students participated from Mexico, Scotland, England, Canada and the US, with specialties in Linguistics, Social Work, Psychology, Latin American Studies, and Anthropology. Continue reading

2009 Report

Field School – Students’ Reflections

 

Our 2009 Field Methods and Quechua Language courses were held from May through August. Undergraduate and graduate student participants came from the US, Canada, United Kingdom, Korea, Mexico and Germany, with academic emphases in Anthropology, Archaeology, Latin American Studies, Spanish, Political Science, International Studies, Biology, Environmental Science, Public Policy, Ethics and Political Science. Several students from each session stayed on to support our work with local communities and to carry out further independent field research. Continue reading

2008 Report

2008 Students’ Reflections

 

Our programs for 2008 were exceptional, with regard to both student participation and community activities implemented. Three sessions were held, extending from the June Solstice through the September Equinox, encompassing important agricultural and social aspects of the Andean calendar. The multifaceted program themes included issues of agrobiodiversity, traditional healing practices, systems of rural health and education, community organization and fiestas. Both undergraduate and graduate students from Canada , Mexico , Chile , Austria and the US , majoring in anthropology, Latin American Studies, medicine, political science, international studies, environmental studies, agriculture, neurobiology, psychology, and education participated in the field course. Please refer to their reflections on their experiences in the 2008 program. Continue reading

2007 Report

Significant learnings

 

In 2007 we held two field school sessions focused on issues in Andean biodiversity, natural healing, community organization, rural health and education, as well as religion and fiesta practices. Both undergraduate and graduate students from Canada, United Kingdom, Finland, Sweden and the US, majoring in anthropology, public health, medicine, rural sociology, political science, international studies, chemistry, biology, psychology, art history, Spanish and Latin American studies participated in the field course. Please see their comments on their learnings and experiences in the 2007 program. Continue reading

2006 Report

Significant learnings

 

Andean society and practices

  • Here in the Andean highlands there exist a complex social network among neighbors, families, land owners, health workers and shop owners, to name a few. People really depend upon each other and strive for balance within society that appears egalitarian. Land use for food, animal husbandry and general resources reflect a balance or fluidity, as well.
  • Going to market and watching people walk for very long distances to sell their goods opened my eyes to the differences in conceptions of time and energy. The notion of the “Peruvian hour” and the importance of stopping to interact with people you know along the way, struck me.
  • Learning about the different foods that are grown and produced in this region has been a very satisfying experience. Going to market to see the potato and corn varieties as well as sampling them here at the chacra allowed me a greater understanding of the people I saw tending their crops on a daily basis.
  • I enjoyed the variety of activities and thought the cuy healing was a highlight because I have never seen anything like it.
  • The coca leaf, tobacco and pisco are viewed as sacred, respected entities that aren’t necessarily abused or consumed in mass quantities. Consumption has been a theme in my mind since arriving here, and being aware of my own consumption is just one aspect of things I have become more aware of.

Continue reading

2005 Report

Ethnographic Field Methods Program, Year 4

 

In 2005 the Center for Social Well Being carried out our June program with courses in language, ethnography, and field methods. Students were housed at the center’s rural base, an adobe lodge on an ecological ranch in the Cordillera Blanca mountain range of the Callejón de Huaylas, 7 hours northeast of Lima. Coursework consisted of classes in Spanish, Quechua, Ethnography of Andean Knowledge, and Participatory Action Research theory and methods. Continue reading

2003 Report

Ethnographic Field Methods Program, Year


 

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The Center for Social Well Being, a non-profit Peruvian-based research institute, carried out a 3 week Summer Program with courses in language, ethnography, and field methods from June 15 – July 5, 2003. Students were housed at the center’s rural base, an adobe lodge on an ecological ranch in the Cordillera Blanca mountain range of the Callejon de Huaylas, 7 hours northeast of Lima. Coursework consisted of classes in Spanish, Quechua, Ethnography of Andean Knowledge, and Participatory Action Research theory and methods. Continue reading

2002 Report

Summer in the Andes: Ethnographic Field School, Year I


 

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

CSW held its first field research methods training course for undergraduate and graduate students in June, 2002. The majority of participants in the two week course were undergraduates from US universities who had completed their third year of academic study. Director of CSW, Patricia Hammer, created and managed the summer program. Faculty Associate A.B. Coe taught and supervised the Health Advocacy component, while S. Wegner provided readings and led field visits to archaeological sites in the region. As Peruvian residents, P. Hammer, A.B. Coe and S. Wegner often serve as mentors to Peruvian and international graduate and undergraduate students in the development of their field investigations. Other Associate Faculty members teach and serve as advisors to graduate and undergraduate students at Peruvian universities year round in Ancash and Lima, where thesis research is a principal requirement. Continue reading