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Research 2010

Society for Applied Anthropology (www.sfaa.net) “Vulnerabilities and Exclusion in Globalization”
Mérida, México 70th Annual Meeting, March 24-27 2010

Invulnerabilidad y desglobalización:
Cultural resilience in health, agriculture, religion, fiestas and development in the Andes

An important finding in exploring responses to “globalization” among “vulnerable” societies is the strength of cultural continuity and resurgence of ancestral practices in the face of imposed models of “first world” progress. This collection of presentations provide Andean examples of how transnational interventions provoke actions that reinforce Quechua regional identity based on a shared cosmovisión of the inseparability of humans with their environment. Such responses contest neoliberal exigencies of the commoditization of natural resources, agroindustrialization, technocolonialization of thought through media and education, etc. Participants will interpret their exploratory field experiences with rural Quechua community members in attempts to understand and analyze alternative conceptualizations of life and society in the contemporary Andes. Key words: cultural continuity, field work, the Andes 

Session organizers 

Patricia J. Hammer (Center for Social Well Being)
Flor de María Barreto Tosi (Center for Social Well Being)
Discussant: Sydney Silverstein (University of Kansas) Continue reading

Research 2013

Society for Applied Anthropology  
73rd Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado March 19th – 23rd 2013
Conference theme: Natural Resource Distribution and Development in the 21st Century

Session Organizer:
Patricia Jean Hammer
Center for Social Well Being www.socialwellbeing.org
Title:
The Inseparability of Natural and Social Resources in the Andes:
From Field Experience to Cognitive Epiphany
Continue reading

2014 Report

FIELD SCHOOLStudents’ Reflections

I feel that there is a common, important thread that forms the backbone of culture here which is the relationship people have with the environment. The close connection with Mother Earth is visible through profound knowledge of traditional farming techniques, abilities to read weather patterns, and the use of various herbs for an array of ailments. Continue reading

2013 Report

FIELD SCHOOL – Students’ Reflections

 

We initiated the year with our fourth New Year’s course as an intersession seminar, where we worked closely with the voluntary women’s associations of the Communities of Shilla and Shumay within the Province of Carhuaz to address issues of transparency in local government and identify capacity building needs for each organization, in conjunction with our ally civic association, Forum Solidaridad Peru (www.psf.org). We continued community support throughout the year on themes of agrobiodiversity in the face of Climate and Culture Change and the return to organic native grain propagation, focused on quinua, kiwicha and cañihua, particularly in the Quebrada Ulta, within the District of Shilla. Our May through August courses emphasized both Field Methods and Quechua Language practice and skills development in context. Professionals, as well as undergraduate and graduate students, participated from the US, Puerto Rico and Canada, with a wide range of majors that included Global Health, Medicine, Biology, International Communications, Social Work, Spanish Language, Latin American History, as well as Anthropology and Archaeology. Continue reading

2012 Report

FIELD SCHOOL – Students’ Reflections

 

We inaugurated the year with our third New Year’s course as an intersession seminar where we worked with communities within the Province of Carhuaz of Shumay, Pariacaca and Shilla to address diverse issues such as corruption in government nutrition programs, first birth experiences, and the erosion and proposed recovery of native tree species at high altitudes and agrobiodiversity. Our June and July courses emphasized Field Methods, as well as Spanish and Quechua Language practice and skills development in context. Undergraduate and graduate students participated from Canada, Portugal, Colombia, Puerto Rico and the US, with a wide range of majors that included Environmental Studies, Sociology, Global Health, Biology, International Development, English, History, Music, and Anthropology. Continue reading

2011 Report

Field School – Students’ Reflections

 

We inaugurated the year with our second New Year’s course as an intersession seminar, where we worked closely with the organized women’s association of the Community of Shilla to address issues of medicinal herb knowledge and the return to organic native maize agricultural. Our May through August courses emphasized both Field Methods and Quechua Language practice and skills development in context. Undergraduate and graduate students participated from Peru, Canada, Germany and the US, with a wide range of majors that included Latin American Studies, Global Health, Medicine, Biology, International Development Studies, Music, Theatre, Social Justice, Spanish Language and Anthropology. Continue reading

2010 Report

Field School – Students’ Reflections

 

We inaugurated the year with our first ever New Year’s session with an intersession seminar, that provided rich focus on herbal ecology and agricultural activities. Our May through August courses emphasized both Field Methods and Quechua Language practice and skills development in context. Undergraduate and graduate students participated from Mexico, Scotland, England, Canada and the US, with specialties in Linguistics, Social Work, Psychology, Latin American Studies, and Anthropology. Continue reading

2009 Report

Field School – Students’ Reflections

 

Our 2009 Field Methods and Quechua Language courses were held from May through August. Undergraduate and graduate student participants came from the US, Canada, United Kingdom, Korea, Mexico and Germany, with academic emphases in Anthropology, Archaeology, Latin American Studies, Spanish, Political Science, International Studies, Biology, Environmental Science, Public Policy, Ethics and Political Science. Several students from each session stayed on to support our work with local communities and to carry out further independent field research. Continue reading

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